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had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took over office in june. that order is
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
. ♪ nothing beats a family. >> a fox news alert and some explosives new fallout on the streets of cairo as thousands of egyptians stage angry demonstrations over a power grab by the country's recently elected president. i'm rick folbalm. >> heather: and i'm heather childers. accusing morsi of an unprecedented attack on the judiciary. and this is after last year's revolution and they continued to stage rallies across the country, sparking new fears on the instability in an already volatile part of the world. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo, egypt. steve? >> heather, there's a showdown between egypt' new president, morsi and the chief judges throughout the country say they will not go back to work as long as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria an
on the day's headlines. you are looking at live pictures from cairo where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell.
get can caught up on the day's headlines right now. you are looking at live pictures from cairo. where anti-government protesters are spending the night in tahrir square. they are protesting morsi's decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas, we will have more on this story at the bottom of the hour. and an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters before noon, a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people in the hospital, construction workers were among the few in the building because it's a holiday weekend. a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings. a camera captured the moment of the blast. mostly emergency workers were injured. they were called to the scene because of reports of the gas smell. they evacuated most of the area an hour before the explosion. superstorm sandy is at $29 billion at cost. governor chris christie said that the final total will only be known after taking into accou
the egyptian assembly agreed on a final constitution. a vote is expected today. holly williams is in cairo. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
have reports from gaza city and tel aviv, and talk with journalist nancy youssef in cairo, where diplomatic efforts to broker peace are under way. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elec
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the new egyptian president has basically, on paper, put himself above the law here saying the courts have no say, and obviously, there's a lot of people -- tens of thousands of egyptians -- who are not happy with it. morsi supporters say this was a necessary move to try to get rid of holdovers from the old regime of hosni mubarak. they say it's only temporary until they get a new constitution. but opponents are furious a
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are positive the law, not subject to being evoked by egyptian courts. he is meeting with chief justices in cairo looking for some sort of compromise solution, perhaps limiting that decree but the big question whether any limits or talk of compromise will be enough for people that have come out on the stree
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
of that video in cairo and elsewhere. >> usually they do put the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. out before the big general assembly meetings which were about to begin. >> reporter: great point. >> that's probably one of the reasons they selected her as well. that's at least what i've been told by insiders. dana, thanks very much. >>> we're now only 35 days away from the so-called fiscal cliff. deep cuts in federal spending coupled with sharp tax increases by law they take effect automatically and many experts fear will throw the u.s. economy back into a recession. both congress and the white house are trying to make a deficit reduction deal to avoid the financial chaos. and president obama's reverting to some campaign mode right now to try to make sure things are done his way. our white house correspondent dan lothian is joining us now with new information. what are you learning, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, while senior members of the administration including secretary geithner, chief of staff jack lou also top advisor meeting with -- the president himself trying to sell his vision to the public
. >>> tear gas in cairo near the u.s. embassy as the fight for democracy goes on. >> face to face. susan rice and john mccain, the man who wanted watergate style hearings, meet. and only cnn catches up with mccain before the big meeting. >> what do you have to learn today from miss rice? >> whatever ambassador rice wants to tell me. she's the one who asked for the meeting. i didn't. >> wouldn't you like to be a fly on the wall? >>> spyfall, real-life bond movie. yasser arafat's body was exhumed. was the palestinian leader po h poisoned by israeli spies? >>> plus this. >> you said walden is in trouble. >> i'm the trouble walden has been in, repeatedly. >> he calls it filth, the half in "two and a half men" begs you not to watch his show. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin with a high stakes meeting just minutes from now. this hour, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations will muster all of her diplomatic skills and tiptoe through a political mine field. susan rice meets with republican senator john mccain. as you
. the arab league is convening in cairo to discuss the situation in gaza. this desk will be live all throughout the morning and afternoon to bring you the latest information, so when we have breaking news, we'll toss it back up to you. >> we appreciate that, nick. thank you. and let's take you back to the israeli side of the border. israeli tanks and troops certainly taking up positions there, trying to get us back to fred. what are you seeing there in terms of military activity? >> reporter: hi, randi. there's a lot of military activity on this side of the border. on the one hand, you have the air strikes that the israeli air force is conducting there over gaza. sara was talking about it just a little bit. as she was talking, there was actually a bomb being dropped on gaza that we could see here from our position. i'd say we're about four, maybe five kilometers away from the gaza border, but we do see it right behind us. we also saw those rockets that sara was talking about that were being fired out of gaza. those were actually fired in the direction of where we are right now. some
the new pharoah. we'll go live to cairo. heather: and expectant parents given the worst news possible about their baby, but what happens next can best be described as a thanksgiving prayer come true. stay tuned for this. >> they told me that he was alive, so it was wonderful, you know? everybody's happy, everybody's crying now because it was life. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine
that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets that were fired into israel. president obama has committed more funding to iron dome. and i think that it really does cement the fact that this president and this administration has been a tremendous
-- that anti-islamic video that sparked the riots in cairo. that's the confusion, that film or a terrorist attack? they got 20 intelligence reports blaming the film riot in cairo. but, this is critical, those reports were disproved over time. but disproved after petraeus made his initial presentation to congress. so david petraeus believes there's a lot of confusion and a lot of misrepresentation of what he originally told congress when he briefed them initially after the attacks. he wants to go up there tomorrow, sort it all out. he will also say he had his own talking points separate from u.n. ambassador susan rice. that came from somewhere other in the administration than his direct talking point. so he wants to get all this sorted out. he believes it was the al qaeda sympathizer group ansar al sharia that was responsible for the attacks. >> so the question, barbara, is he is convinced that the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi had nothing, nothing to do with that anti-muslim video that'd been posted on youtube, that this was a terrorist attack by this al qaeda affiliated organiz
and cairo. >> people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction. >> reporter: clinton expects egypt to play a key role in maintaining peace. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> the woman of who has taken a lot of heat in the aftermath of the benghazi attack is now defending herself. yeah. for weeks, u.n. ambassador susan rice has been attacked by senator john mccain for participating in what he described as a cover-up. >> this president and this administration have either been guilty of colossal incompetence or engaged in a cover-up. >> mccain says rice made misleading comments in the days immediately following the benghazi attack in libya. >>> rice is being considered for secretary of state. some republican senators have vowed to block her nomination. she spoke publicly about the controversy finally yesterday. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the inform
. protesters on the streets of cairo for a fourth straight day. you can see the crowds there. battle lines are now drawn. we're talking about newly empowered islamists versus remnants of the mubarak regime and the country's deeply divided liberals. they're going at it. the president's new powers now. today egyptian president mohammed morsi is meeting with the country's top judges to explain the extraordinary powers that he granted himself on thursday. among the decrees, judges cannot overturn any decision he makes or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constituti
today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any dec
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
will arrive in cairo tomorrow. both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home a message to hamas, that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilianes with impunity. we have been trying to keep down the amount of civilian deaths on their side. compare that to hamas on us. they are trying to maximize the amount of civilians that they kill. that's the different between a terrorist organization and democratic country. >> i think it takes two to tango here. the ambassador knows that israel invoked hamas by taking out one of their -- on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other fashions would retaliate. so they are also to be blamed for the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states, for international community, to force and pressure israel to lift the siege and that i believe will lead it putting an end to these facilities across the border. >> >>> president barack obama is in asia at this hour but not everyone is happy about his latest stop. the important political figure he is
in cairo for talks tomorrow and arab league foreign ministers are set to visit gaza on tuesday. but both israelis and palestinians say the solution must come from the other side. >> we are trying to drive home the message to hamas that they cannot shoot at israeli civilians, try to kill israeli civilians with impunity and we've been able to reduce to a remarkable extent the amount of civilian casualties on their side. compare that to what hamas is doing to us. they're trying to maximize the number of israeli civilians they kill. that's the difference between a terrorist organization and a democratic country. >> i think, the ambassador knows that it was israel who provoked hamas by taking arms with one of the commanders on wednesday. they knew that hamas and other actions in the gaza strip would retaliate, so they also are to be blamed for this escalation in the violence between the gaza strip and israel. it's time for the united states and the international community to force and pressure israel to lift the siege, and that, i believe, will lead to putting an end. >> meanwhile, palestinia
protest in cairo, top association of judges want every judge to walk off the job. they are angry because of a decree giving mohamed morsi unchecked power. they call the decree an unprecedented attack. >>> an irish newspaper editor resigned after publishing topless photographs of kate. kate is sun bathing with prince william on vacation in a private home. a french magazine first published the photos. >>> a shootout in alabama left a deputy sheriff dead and another in critical condition. deputy scott ward was killed yesterday when the deputies responded to a family dispute in a mobile home. the gunman was also killed during that confrontation. >>> superstorm sandy has cost new jersey more than $29 billion in damage and that number could easily rise. governor chris christie's office said the final total will only be known taking into account next summer's tourism season. governor cuomo will ask the federal government for $30 billion to help with his state's recovery. >>> investigators in the west bank are getting ready to open the tomb of yasser arafat. it will be exhumed on tuesday. it wil
israeli and palestinian officials, secretary of state hillary clinton will head to cairo where negotiations will continue with egyptian officials. rob, paula. >> thanks, matt. and joining us live on the phone from jerusalem is our lama hasan. >> lama, thank you for joining us. what is the latest? >> good morning to you. well there is no peace agreement announced just yet. there was optimism last night but it was cautious optimism that a cease-fire would be announced and some kind of deal would be reached, but the terms that have been laid out by both sides, israelis and hamas officials are quite complicated. and even secretary clinton hinted it would take some time to finally reach an agreement when she met prime minister benjamin netanyahu last night here in jer ruse lem standing side by side. she did say, however, that they did have producti ivive talks a reiterated the clear message that america's commitment to israel's security is unwavering, and she was quite strong about it. clinton said that hamas must stop its rockets on israel as we just heard in that piece. adding isr
. next week a court in cairo will attempt to decide whether it is even a constitutional move. reza sayah is live for us in cairo. before we talk about how he's justifying the powers, you're getting new information on a huge move from the muslim brotherhood. reza, are you with me? we're going to work on getting -- >> reporter: brooke, the muslim brotherhood has canceled their 1 million man demonstration. of course it could energize the opposition factions behind us with their 1 million man demonstration, but there is absolutely no indication at this point that the muslim brotherhood is losing support. remember, this is a powerful organization, one of the most powerful organizations in the political landscape, in egypt, and at this point, i think many people will look at this at face value, someone sensible in the muslim brotherhood made the decision they have competing demonstrations tomorrow that could be the potential for violence. several days have passed since the decrees and the outcome hasn't been pleasant. was this just a bad miscalculation by the president? >> not at all. it is a
willing to listen to the other? up next the negotiations happening right now in cairo. negotiations to end the fighting between israel and hamas. obviou. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting drivetoendhunger.org. in the drive to end hunger try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone
reports that it might have been related to that riot that broke out in cairo just before the attack regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have be
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